Bluestockings Magazine

Blue·stock·ing n. a person with strong scholarly or literary interests; in the past this term was used derogatorily towards educated women.

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Ask Oh Megan and The CSPH: Where Do I Find Ethical Porn?

Ask Oh Megan and The CSPH: Where Do I Find Ethical Porn?

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Welcome to our month-long series on sex & sexuality! If you’d like to contribute content related to the field of sex & sexuality (academic, prose, poetry, art, etc.) please submit to blogbluestockings@gmail.com (This collaboration is brought to you by Chanelle Adams, Editor in Chief of Bluestockings and Web Development Intern at The CSPH). The following is re-published content from thecsph.org wi…

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A Woman’s Education: So, This is the Way It Works

A Woman’s Education: So, This is the Way It Works

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By Beth Taylor, Contributor

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Red-Winged Blackbirds

"And they understood each other. Perhaps that was the most important thing. She thought about it now, of walking to the cafe, of ordering an espresso lined with an ivory foam; she thought of sitting for hours, devouring some novel where the characters glide so effortlessly through life on glamorous adventures and there was a steady well-spring of action."

by Abigail Sheaffer

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15 Percent

becauseiamawoman:

“As many as 15 percent of freshmen at America’s top schools are white students who failed to meet their university’s minimum standards for admission, according to Peter Schmidt, deputy editor of the Chronicle of Higher Education. These kids are “people with a long-standing relationship with the university,” or in other words, the children of faculty, wealthy alumni and politicians. According to Schmidt, these unqualified but privileged kids are nearly twice as common on top campuses as Black and Latino students who had benefited from affirmative action.”

Ten myths about affirmative action (via linzyxxxxx)

This is EXTREMELY blatant on college campuses. The fact that these things need to be clarified is sad.

(via newwavefeminism)

Legacy is the real affirmative action…and yet we don’t see certain types of entitled people suing to dismantle that.

(via invisiblelad)

(Source: sociolab)

wouldbelovely:

itsvondell:

I suspect that Jo Rowling probably imagined James and Harry as white too, i don’t mind that, that’s her business.

Personally I’m mentally acting against the white-as-default-unless-otherwise-specified that’s pervasive in imagining media especially in predominately white fandom culture.

I’ve generally operated on a POC-unless-otherwise-noted basis with how I imagine characters. My HP headcanons aren’t What If Everybody In Harry Potter Was Black Instead Of White. They only read that way if you’re still stuck in the white-as-default zone.

James’ skin color, hair texture, etc to my knowledge has never been specified and that means to me that even a reader who strictly contains themselves within the bounds of canon is free to imagine him as any number of ethnicities.

In absence of a specified race I chose to imagine the one that makes the story most compelling to me.

In absence of a specified race I chose to imagine the one that makes the story most compelling to me.

My James is black because that creates the most personally compelling racial background for my Harry. It is informed by my interpretation of the canon interactions between the Potters and the Evans/Dursleys, whom Jo Rowling and I probably imagine very similarly. It is informed by my experience as the black mixed-race child of a black man and a white woman who grew up more or less estranged from both my parents largely in the care of my white maternal aunt and her family, household, values, and prejudices. It is informed by my personal desire for a black mixed-race hero story.

Probably most important to me, my desire to create and disseminate content that involves non-white interpretations of popularly-imagined-white-by-default characters reflects my desire to speak to people like me, who are not used to seeing faces like theirs represented in the popular media they consume. It reflects my fight against white-as-default. It reflects my desire to contribute to young people of color feeling empowered by popular fiction and not othered by it. It reflects my desire not to let blockbuster casting directors dictate what you may or may not imagine the characters that populate your fiction to be.

It’s not arbitrary and it doesn’t come from nowhere, but if it did, that would be fine too. All my interpretations are based squarely in canon. But if they weren’t, that would be damn well acceptable. Squeeze representation out of anywhere you can feel it and fabricate the rest. Own your fiction.

The James as black headcanon not only works, it adds a whole different depth to the story. First off, Vernon’s intenser hatred for James than Lily, The whole Pure-Race dogma of the death eaters, the fact that James, though pureblood, didn’t seem to have any Death Eater family members like Sirius did. 

Then Harry as mixed, the teasing he got at school, the fact that he was never mistaken for an actual relative of the Dursley’s in public. His black uncontrollable hair that his white family had NO IDEA how to deal with. His eyes were always considered striking though it’s not an unusual color for whites. 

Screw it, headcanon accepted. 

(via sarlett)

fyqueerlatinxs:

Fuck Yeah Queer Latin@s in Books!

  1. Trauma Queen by Lovemme Corazón
  2. Chulito by Charles Rice-Gonzalez
  3. Down to the Bone by Maya Lazara Dole
  4. City of Night by John Rechy
  5. The Rain God by Arturo Islas
  6. The Dirty Girls Social Club by Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez
  7. The Cha Cha Files: A Chapina Poetica by Maya Chinchilla
  8. Their Dogs Came with Them by Helena Maria Viramontes
  9. Make Love to Rage by Morgan Robyn Colladooc

(via thedumbestblogger)

Featured Artist: Kah Yangni

Featured Artist: Kah Yangni

 Kah Yangni is a multidisciplinary creative artist that works most often with the written word, illustration, handlettering, and her numerous journals. She has taught art to kids and teens, and has had her work published in how-to manuals, coloring books, art journals, mobile apps, and at her legit artist website, www.kahyangni.com

Her work has also been featured in the fourth issue of Bluestockings.

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History of the Center For Sexual Pleasure & Health

History of the Center For Sexual Pleasure & Health

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 Welcome to our month-long series on sex & sexuality! If you’d like to contribute content related to the field of sex & sexuality (academic, prose, poetry, art, etc.) please submit to blogbluestockings@gmail.com. (This collaboration is brought to you by Chanelle Adams, Editor in Chief of Bluestockings and Web Development Intern at The CSPH.)

The following is re-published content fromthecsph.org with permission from the lovely, local 501c3 organization. We believe that our mission at Bluestockings aligns with the goals of The CSPH to reduce sexual shame, challenge misinformation and advance the field of sexology.

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