Blue·stock·ing n. a person with strong scholarly or literary interests; in the past this term was used derogatorily towards educated women
janetmock:

Queen. One of our greatest minds.

janetmock:

Queen. One of our greatest minds.

In the 48th Weekend Links: an open letter to privileged people who play devil’s advocate, Jacqueline Rose’s call for a scandalous feminism, a trans* woman’s response to The New York Times article on being a trans* man at Wellesley, and more!

a letter from the editors: welcome back

obsidian-magazine:

dear readers,

OBSIDIAN is back for fall 2014 with a new look and all new content. we are proud to present our first week, featuring narratives of Black women and womanhood that incorporate discussions on gender identity, queer identity, and femininity.

after closing out a successful semester in the spring, we underwent major changes. we have an incredible team of staff writers, designers, planners and creators making the magazine happen, and we want to make that team even bigger.

if you are interested in learning more about OBSIDIAN and joining a team dedicated to elevating Black voices at Brown, consider submitting to us at obsidianatbrown@gmail.com and check out our meet & greet/info session on October 23 at 6:30 PM in Harambee House. there will be music, food and opportunities to get involved. check out our event flyer below, designed by the incredible anisa holmes.

image

we hope you like what we’re bringing you this year, and we hope to see what you have to bring to the discussion. we’re back, we’re Black, and we’re better than ever.

all our <3,
maya + jasmin + paige

"This list is born out of a desire to meet and connect with other trans* writers and performers. As a person in the midst of not only a gender transition but a literary transition, I find myself watching other trans* performance poets moreand more each day. I’m learning from their content, presentation, and even the slightest movements of their mouths. I feel honored to have shared spaces and stages with so many of the brightest and bravest truth-tellers that the current queer slam scene has to offer.”
by Tyler Vile

obsidian-magazine:

I LOVE BEING A BLACK GIRL BECAUSE… (part. 4)

photographer: Alex Karim ‘17

thepeoplesrecord:

One powerful illustration shows exactly what’s wrong with the way the West talks about EbolaOctober 12, 2014
The Ebola epidemic has killed 3,431 people in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia; it has killed one in the United States. Liberia’s Defense Minister Brownie Samukai told the U.N. Security Council in September that the disease poses a “serious threat" to the country’s existence; the Obama administration recently reminded everybody that “[America’s] structure would preclude an outbreak.” Health care workers are threatening to strike over dissatisfaction with wages; the U.S. sent 3,000 military personnel directly into the area to help combat the epidemic.
The Ebola headlines in Western media outlets, however, don’t tell that story. The Western media circus has lapped up the Ebola epidemic and paraded it around as its newest act. It’s everywhere you look — stories about “necessary” precautions, tales of children and even police cars under quarantine, fear that the disease has spread to other parts of the country. And it all has one singular focus: America and the West. 
André Carrilho, an illustrator and cartoonist based in Lisbon whose work has appeared in the New York Times, the New Yorker, Vanity Fair and New York magazine, chose to play up this disparity in an August illustration, drawn shortly after two white missionaries stricken with Ebola were admitted to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta."People tend to respond more to illustrations that have a point of view on issues that relate to their lives and their opinions," he told Mic in an email.  
The Ebola epidemic hit a particular nerve with the artist. “People in the African continent are more regarded as an abstract statistic than a patient in the U.S. or Europe,” he said. ”How many individual stories do we know about any African patients? None. They are treated as an indistinguishable crowd.”  
His point is well taken, given the recent arrival of Thomas E. Duncan, the Dallas patient who became America’s only travel-related case of Ebola. He came from Liberia, but the media paid scant attention to the country’s experience with Ebola until his arrival in the United States. Carrilho says the color of Duncan’s skin doesn’t contradict the meaning of the illustration. ”The fact that [Duncan] is black doesn’t change the fact that because he’s on U.S. soil, he deserves more attention in the eyes of the Western media,” he toldMic. It’s not black vs. white in the eyes of the media, but ‘the West vs. the rest.’
"A death in Africa, or Asia for that matter, should be as tragic as a death in Europe or the U.S.A., and it doesn’t seem to be," he said.
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

One powerful illustration shows exactly what’s wrong with the way the West talks about Ebola
October 12, 2014

The Ebola epidemic has killed 3,431 people in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia; it has killed one in the United States. Liberia’s Defense Minister Brownie Samukai told the U.N. Security Council in September that the disease poses a “serious threat" to the country’s existence; the Obama administration recently reminded everybody that “[America’s] structure would preclude an outbreak.” Health care workers are threatening to strike over dissatisfaction with wages; the U.S. sent 3,000 military personnel directly into the area to help combat the epidemic.

The Ebola headlines in Western media outlets, however, don’t tell that story. The Western media circus has lapped up the Ebola epidemic and paraded it around as its newest act. It’s everywhere you look — stories about “necessary” precautions, tales of children and even police cars under quarantine, fear that the disease has spread to other parts of the country. And it all has one singular focus: America and the West. 

André Carrilho, an illustrator and cartoonist based in Lisbon whose work has appeared in the New York Times, the New YorkerVanity Fair and New York magazine, chose to play up this disparity in an August illustration, drawn shortly after two white missionaries stricken with Ebola were admitted to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta.

"People tend to respond more to illustrations that have a point of view on issues that relate to their lives and their opinions," he told Mic in an email.  

The Ebola epidemic hit a particular nerve with the artist. “People in the African continent are more regarded as an abstract statistic than a patient in the U.S. or Europe,” he said. ”How many individual stories do we know about any African patients? None. They are treated as an indistinguishable crowd.”  

His point is well taken, given the recent arrival of Thomas E. Duncan, the Dallas patient who became America’s only travel-related case of Ebola. He came from Liberia, but the media paid scant attention to the country’s experience with Ebola until his arrival in the United States. Carrilho says the color of Duncan’s skin doesn’t contradict the meaning of the illustration. ”The fact that [Duncan] is black doesn’t change the fact that because he’s on U.S. soil, he deserves more attention in the eyes of the Western media,” he toldMic. It’s not black vs. white in the eyes of the media, but ‘the West vs. the rest.’

"A death in Africa, or Asia for that matter, should be as tragic as a death in Europe or the U.S.A., and it doesn’t seem to be," he said.

Full article

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Motherlands is a new zine for POC artists and creators

poczineproject:

Motherlands is a new independent arts zine for artists and writers of colour and will explore themes of dual identities, belonging and the nature and notion of home. Issue one which will be released in print in early November. If you’d like to find out more or get involved in some other way, then send an email to motherlandszine@gmail.com.

www.motherlandszine.com

Rather than set deadlines, submissions will always be open on a rolling basis.

While Motherlands will only be available in print, it will be free (though donations are always welcome) and they’ll be sending it out across the country and beyond to anyone who’s interested so they can pass it along. issues will be released every 1-2 months until their pocket money runs out.

Motherlands was born out of a desire to discover, hear, see and showcase young and emerging artists born in Britain though not of “British” heritage and will explore themes including dual identity, the notion and nature of ‘home’, nationalism and belonging. The zine will also be a platform to showcase emerging international artists outside of Britain and those from various diasporas because at the heart of Motherlands is the need to move against the continued under-representation of artists of colour who are automatically categorised as other and marginalised.

"If we don’t write ourselves into the future, we get written out of tomorrow as well." - Gabriel Teodros

SUBMISSION DETAILS

Motherlands is looking for emerging photographers and artists to include in volume 1 of the printed zine:

We are looking for work that is strong and engaging; while the over-running themes of the zine are personal identity, home, belonging and nationalism, submissions need not be limited to these. We are simply looking for interesting work that deserves to  be seen.

Please submit by sending 2-5 jpeg files along with your name, a link to your website (if applicable) and a short artist’s bio/statement to motherlandszine@gmail.com

Alongside visual artists we would like to hear from writers, essayists and poets to contribute written work for the zine. You don’t have to be a ‘professional’ just someone who has something to say and would like a space to be heard. If this sounds like you then please send an example of your writing or a piece you would like to be included to motherlandszine@gmail.com

Motherlands is edited by Camara.

h/t Rayanne Bushell

_____________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

POCZP hopes you had a great summer! We’ve been working on ways to remain sustainable in the long term while individually practicing #selfcare. In the meantime, you can support the cause by sending us a gift of any amount. All funds go to ongoing advocacy costs, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goals for 2015.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh