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gradientlair:

Angel Haze 

(Source: lanarey, via teamtrashcaptains)

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Weekend Links, Vol.36:

Welcome to another week of feminist web surfing! In Weekend Links we gather a set of the most engaging journalism, prose, poetry, art, and Interweb images or memes we have come across. We hope with this small curation of links to illuminate the work of the prolific and active feminist blogosphere.

Links We Like Feminist Blog Roll Quote of the Week Art Worth Sharing Internet Images FTW

Curated by…

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"If you can say Schwarzenegger, you can say Esparza"

- Raúl Esparza on idiots who kept pressuring him to change his name to something less latino. (via magnetic-rose)

Our names are not a burden.

(via pandulcemami)

(via miracule)

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#NotYourAsianSidekick: Rethinking Protest Spaces and Tactics

#NotYourAsianSidekick: Rethinking Protest Spaces and Tactics

Screen Shot 2014-04-15 at 9.19.27 PM

Though the hashtag #NotYourAsianSidekick ‘erupted’ at the end of last year, it has been on my mind lately as I think through how various social media platforms are used for or facilitate certain kinds of interactions, and how those interactions are often coded through dichotomies of virtual/real and talk/action. For those who missed it, #NotYourAsianSidekick was a hashtag started by 23-year-old…

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afrohoney:

A mix of nature to create beautiful afrocentric street art

(via laurazel)

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smashsurvey:

Now think of how many of those female characters and protagonists are oversexed, created for the male gaze, or put in an inactive damsel role for the plot of the game. Representation matters. A Study last year proved that exposure to tv shows increased the self esteem of young white boys and markedly decreased the confidence and self esteem of girls across the board (and we haven’t even started on the representation of characters of color and the effect it has on children’s self perception). 

Video games are a different media, and even more concerning if representation metrics are changing how our kids think of themselves. Especially knowing that 67% of American Households have video game consoles and 91% of Children play video games regularly,how do you think the portrayal (and lack of portrayals) of women and girls in these games is affecting little girls – or influencing how little boys view their importance and/or influence over them? 

Comics. Movies. Lit. Pop Culture. The Smash Survey is an upcoming podcast project that will critically explore the representation of race, gender, and queer identity in media and pop culture in a fun and engaging format. 

(Source: childrennow.org)

Quote
"The purpose of understanding your privilege isn’t to make you feel something. Not guilt, not shame, not anything else. It’s to help you understand that you have a set of things you take for granted that other people don’t have, so that you can change the way you act."

tacit: Some thoughts on privilege: Look, it isn’t about your guilt. (via brutereason)

(via sweatyemoji)

Quote
"Look, without our stories, without the true nature and reality of who we are as People of Color, nothing about fanboy or fangirl culture would make sense. What I mean by that is: if it wasn’t for race, X-Men doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the history of breeding human beings in the New World through chattel slavery, Dune doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the history of colonialism and imperialism, Star Wars doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the extermination of so many Indigenous First Nations, most of what we call science fiction’s contact stories doesn’t make sense. Without us as the secret sauce, none of this works, and it is about time that we understood that we are the Force that holds the Star Wars universe together. We’re the Prime Directive that makes Star Trek possible, yeah. In the Green Lantern Corps, we are the oath. We are all of these things—erased, and yet without us—we are essential."

Junot Díaz, “The Junot Díaz Episode" (18 November 2013) on Fan Bros, a podcast “for geek culture via people of colors” (via kynodontas)

Let em know dad.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

I think the next time someone gets confused as to possibly why people were hoping Katniss would be portrayed as nonwhite, this quote above is why.

(via thelouringlady)

(via wongkarwais)

Tags: colonialism
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Muff Wiggler: Sexism in Audio Cultures

Muff Wiggler: Sexism in Audio Cultures

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Despite the fact that women have been working with audio technologies (and more broadly electronics and computing) just as long as anyone else, an air of masculinity has taken on a sense of inevitability in spheres of electronic music. As a means of understanding how audio cultures might reify or subvert existing patriarchal structures, I’ll look at some of the ways gender is acknowledged on Muff…

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the-actual-universe:

Reach for Your DreamsThis stunning image is part of the press release for a Radiator Film documentary “Sepideh – Reaching for the Stars”. It follows the dreams of a young Iranian girl, Sepideh, who wants to become an astronaut. Fighting against social expectations, Sepideh teams up with Anousheh Ansari, the first female private space explorer.The trailer is available here.And a blog entry detailing an interview with the film’s director is here.-CBImage: from the film, see Sepideh - Reaching for the Stars

the-actual-universe:

Reach for Your Dreams

This stunning image is part of the press release for a Radiator Film documentary “Sepideh – Reaching for the Stars”. It follows the dreams of a young Iranian girl, Sepideh, who wants to become an astronaut. Fighting against social expectations, Sepideh teams up with Anousheh Ansari, the first female private space explorer.

The trailer is available here.
And a blog entry detailing an interview with the film’s director is here.

-CB

Image: from the film, see Sepideh - Reaching for the Stars

(via spookyoperaghost)

Photo
terrakion:

policymic:

Dreamworks is doing something even Pixar hasn’t tried: A black female heroine

DreamWorks Animation Studios has announced the addition of a black female heroine (gasp!) to its repertoire of white dogs, green ogres, snails, Neanderthals, pandas, white people and Antz. In doing so, it joins an elite club consisting of … well, nobody.
Not one major Hollywood studio has released a 3D animated feature starring a black character.
Read more | Follow policymic


SHES VOICED BY RIHANNA

terrakion:

policymic:

Dreamworks is doing something even Pixar hasn’t tried: A black female heroine

DreamWorks Animation Studios has announced the addition of a black female heroine (gasp!) to its repertoire of white dogs, green ogres, snails, Neanderthals, pandas, white people and Antz. In doing so, it joins an elite club consisting of … well, nobody.

Not one major Hollywood studio has released a 3D animated feature starring a black character.

Read more | Follow policymic

SHES VOICED BY RIHANNA

(via wasarahbi)

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colleenclarkart:

I made a comic with pretty much the same punchline as this other comic I made maybe no one will notice

colleenclarkart:

I made a comic with pretty much the same punchline as this other comic I made maybe no one will notice

(via littlecanuck)

Tags: body image
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feministdisney:

fatgirlscanrockit:

thisisthinprivilege:

writeswrongs:

satelliteshowers:

fattyforever:

curvily:

How often have you been shopping and you come across something that is just PERFECT, but does not go up to your size? Over 60% of American women wear a size 14 or above, but only 17% of clothing sold is 14 & up. That is a ridiculous disparity.
Moreover, when some brands move into plus (ahem H&M), they throw their signature trendy looks by the wayside in favor of flowy dark fabrics that they think “work” for plus sizes. That is crap. Plus size women want color, print, and structure. Moreover, we want variety. A group this numerous cannot be a monolith, and since style is such a personal thing, we all have different tastes. I want #plussizeplease to be a way to showcase the demand for styles we’d buy and rock, and all the money brands are forfeiting by refusing to expand their sizes.
So here’s how to use it:
1) Snap a picture of a garment you love but does not come in your size. Include the brand and price, tagging the company if possible. For example, I am in love with this Zara marble print dress. I would have purchased it yesterday if it went above a size L. My tweet would be:
“.@Zara marble print sheath, $59. I’d buy it right now if it came in my size. #plussizeplease”
2) Use it on any social media – Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest… even Facebook supports hashtags now.
3) Tag anything you’d purchase, whether in store or online.
4) Feel free to include the size range it comes in and/or the size you think you’d need. Sizing can be tricky, so this is definitely not required.
5) Tell your friends! I don’t just want this to be a blogger thing – I want all women who wear size 14 and up to show their purchasing power and share styles they love. Let’s be unignorable!

Um, yes. I will be doing this.

Yes. I support this movement

watch me be loud as hell

Activism! #plussizeplease

Oh i WILL be doing this.

I LOVE and support this idea so much.

feministdisney:

fatgirlscanrockit:

thisisthinprivilege:

writeswrongs:

satelliteshowers:

fattyforever:

curvily:

How often have you been shopping and you come across something that is just PERFECT, but does not go up to your size? Over 60% of American women wear a size 14 or above, but only 17% of clothing sold is 14 & up. That is a ridiculous disparity.

Moreover, when some brands move into plus (ahem H&M), they throw their signature trendy looks by the wayside in favor of flowy dark fabrics that they think “work” for plus sizes. That is crap. Plus size women want color, print, and structure. Moreover, we want variety. A group this numerous cannot be a monolith, and since style is such a personal thing, we all have different tastes. I want #plussizeplease to be a way to showcase the demand for styles we’d buy and rock, and all the money brands are forfeiting by refusing to expand their sizes.

So here’s how to use it:

1) Snap a picture of a garment you love but does not come in your size. Include the brand and price, tagging the company if possible. For example, I am in love with this Zara marble print dress. I would have purchased it yesterday if it went above a size L. My tweet would be:

“.@Zara marble print sheath, $59. I’d buy it right now if it came in my size. #plussizeplease”

2) Use it on any social media – Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest… even Facebook supports hashtags now.

3) Tag anything you’d purchase, whether in store or online.

4) Feel free to include the size range it comes in and/or the size you think you’d need. Sizing can be tricky, so this is definitely not required.

5) Tell your friends! I don’t just want this to be a blogger thing – I want all women who wear size 14 and up to show their purchasing power and share styles they love. Let’s be unignorable!

Um, yes. I will be doing this.

Yes. I support this movement

watch me be loud as hell

Activism! #plussizeplease

Oh i WILL be doing this.

I LOVE and support this idea so much.

(via daishannigans)

Tags: plus size
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From Green Day to the Homewreckers: Cristy Road on Creating QWOC Spaces in Punk

From Green Day to the Homewreckers: Cristy Road on Creating QWOC Spaces in Punk

medusa2

Cristy C. Road is a Cuban-American zine-maker, writer, illustrator, Green Day fan, Gemini and all-round bad-ass. She has published several illustrated books—Indestructible (2006), Bad Habits: A Love Story (2008), Spit and Passion (2012)—and is currently working on a tarot card deck and making music with her band, The Homewreckers. Road was part of the Sister Spit: The Next Generation Tour in 2007…

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